Do you use assessment data (formative or summative) to inform your choice of resource?

This topic contains 5 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Markeeta Roe-Phillips Markeeta Roe-Phillips 2 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #444
    Profile photo of Selena Woodward Selena Woodward 
    Keymaster

    When you’re planning to meet the needs of the students in your room, how does prior assessment affect or influence your choice?

  • #597
    Profile photo of Tammie Meehan Tammie Meehan 
    Participant
    Points: 1089

    This relates to an argument I had with my Leadership team tonight. I was hoping that someone here would have some ideas.
    Our school is looking for ideas to motivate students and help them understand their learning goals. Many teachers believe that putting data (gained from formative and summative assessment) on walls motivates the students- shows them what they need to aim for. In my opinion, I believe that it is a way to create competition in classrooms and demoralises the students who are taking longer to learn than others, it also forces the students to compare themselves against others. I think their opinions of themselves takes a hit. It also affects the students doing fairly well because they may become scared to take risks and make mistakes in case they end up in the lower levels which will be displayed on a wall for all to see. I also see many parents comparing their children against others.
    Does anyone have any ideas that encourages and motivates your students without the wall shaming? Would love to hear them 🙂

    • #981
      Profile photo of Markeeta Roe-Phillips Markeeta Roe-Phillips 
      Participant
      Points: 2140

      I’m all for using a data wall, but not in view of the children or parents! That’s a scary idea. Unless there were someway of having the data points depersonalised? Perhaps the children knowing only their own number or symbol?

      My lot love to compete against themselves. One example of this is in our quick write sessions. Even though it’s like comparing apples and oranges because each topic is so different (and let’s not talk about the varying ‘quality’ of the writing), they record the number of lines they write in each session at the top of their page and try to beat their own “PB” each time. There has been an overall upwards trend in their stamina so they do regularly beat their own “PB” which is a fantastic help towards developing that belief that with effort comes development.

  • #982
    Profile photo of Markeeta Roe-Phillips Markeeta Roe-Phillips 
    Participant
    Points: 2140

    It really does depend on the learning area but I use assessment data a lot! For something like maths fluency we depend VERY heavily on prior assessment in determining who will receive additional support (e.g. QuickSmart sessions); but for something like HASS it’s very much more a case of prior anecdotal knowledge or observations of a child informing my planning. For example: we recently ran a ‘town hall’ style project; we were running out of term so I created the groups. Based on previous observations I made sure that my research ‘strugglers’ were paired with mentors who would scaffold and support the research components of the project.

    In reading and writing ALL of my planning is based on prior (and ongoing) assessment. My small groups are created from notes I take during conferences, running records, class observations and from checking in with each student’s reading journal and writing book. Mini-lessons are often planned from observed trends within this data. Reading materials for whole class instruction are chosen based on their ‘reading accessibility’ for different groups of children.

    After any standardised tests we use the data to address specific issues with individuals or groups, and use the trend data to plan further whole group instruction.

    I could keep going but I think you get the point! 🙂

    • #983
      Profile photo of Selena Woodward Selena Woodward 
      Keymaster

      It sounds like you’re nailing it 🙂 Have a look at this grammar/punctuation idea . You might be able to adapt it to your students? http://www.teachertechnologies.com/grammar-fun-points-for-punctuation/ It used to make such a massive difference to sentence style and structures in my secondary classroom.

    • #985
      Profile photo of Markeeta Roe-Phillips Markeeta Roe-Phillips 
      Participant
      Points: 2140

      Thank you! I love your idea. I will definitely be ‘borrowing’ it and building it into our quick writes. It will definitely add something special to the competition!

      We’ve been unpacking some mentor sentences recently (because I noticed that my class are using the same ol’ sentence structures over and over) and looking at the way word placement and punctuation *make* a sentence. The general knowledge of grammar has improved dramatically, and this is starting to be transferred in to everyday writing. Woo hoo! I nearly cried when I saw a version of “I have a dream that one day my children will live in a country where they will be judged not by the colour of their skin but rather by the content of their character”. I did cry (ok, well… I teared up) when I saw commas separating an appositive after someone noticed that the author had used that technique in one of our sentences.

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